Comprehensive Plan of 2006

Comprehensive Plan of 2006

In 2002 Mayor Williams directed the Office of Planning to revise the District Elements of the Comprehensive Plan, which establishes land use policies for the next 20 years. The Mayor and the D.C. Council appointed a Comprehensive Plan Revision Task Force which included 4 members of the Committee of 100. The task force met over the next 3 1/2 years and provided guidance to the Office of Planning on where development should be targeted, where discouraged, how land could foster jobs, affordable housing, and economic development, and how new priorities affecting the environment, transportation, and emerging technologies could be promoted.

While a goal of the revision to reduce the size of the city plan document was not achieved, the 2006 Comprehensive Plan is organized in an efficient and accessible format and for the first time includes an Implementation Element that provides specific guidance about which agencies are responsible for implementing policies and a timetable for completion of those tasks. The plan and the Generalized Land Use Map and Future Land Use Map were enacted into law in December 2006. All regulatory land use measures, including zoning rules, must not be inconsistent with the 2006 Comprehensive Plan. As stated in the Home Rule Act, the Land Use Element distills the policies contained in all the other elements and as such it is the primary element. The Future Land Use map depicts the policies in the Land Use Element.

A major focus of the Committee of 100 was to ensure that the plan would provide predictable policies that residents and developers could rely on and that new initiatives would not compromise the stability and historic pattern of the District’s built environment. In that regard the Committee of 100 pressed for conservation areas, specific land use change areas, rezoning of row house neighborhoods to reflect the existing character and to remove the incentive to redevelop these neighborhoods, hierarchies of development and uses in commercial districts, buffering between commercial and residential zones, and enhanced protections for historic districts and landmarks.

comp plan