Parks & Environment

Parks & Environment

The Parks and Open Space Subcommittee works to ensure the preservation of parks and open space in Washington, D.C. in line with the principles of the McMillan Plan.

Documents

icon C100 Comments Anacostia Waterfront
March 16, 2017, Stephen A. Hansen & Beth Purcell
The Committee of 100 on the Federal City (C100) welcomes the opportunity to provide comments on the Environmental Assessment (EA) for Anacostia Park, a vital community and natural resource.   The management plan describes four alternatives:  three action alternatives and a no-action alternative, and analyzes the potential impacts these alternatives would have on the natural, cultural, and human environment.  We agree with the National Park Service that Alternative 3 should be the preferred alternative, and offer suggestions to enhance its positive aspects.
icon 2017-02-24 C100 Comp Plan Resiliency Study
February 24, 2017, Parks & Environment Subcommittee
DC Office of Planning (OP) and DC Department of Energy and Environment  (DOEE) recommend that climate resilience be incorporated in the DC Comprehensive Plan.  We commend them for this important forward-looking step.  Climate change will cause rising water levels and increased flooding.  To add to these challenges, there will be more people living in the city.  DC's 2015 population was 672,228, and OP projects population will increase to 987,245 in 2045.[1]

[1]OP, Citywide Community Workshop #6, 3 Nov. 2016.  DOEE, "Climate Ready DC: The District of Columbia's Plan to Adapt to a Changing Climate, draft for public comment" 10, 16 (2013).  Rising temperatures caused by climate change and effects on other infrastructure such as Metro, communications, Metrorail, and utilities are beyond the scope of this report.
icon 2016-05-11 C100 Report On Proposed Bird Friendly Changes To The DC Building Code
May 11, 2016, Parks & Environment Subcommittee
In a few months (DOEE), DC Department of Transportation (DDOT), DC Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) and other agencies will begin the three-year cycle of reviewing the DC Building Code (regulations, not a statute) for possible changes. This is an opportunity to improve the building code by adopting architectural and lighting standards to improve bird safety as part of the city's commitment to energy conservation and green building. Changes to the DC Green Building Code to make buildings more bird-friendly will reduce bird collisions with buildings, save lives of birds, and save energy. Other cities have changed their building codes to mandate standards for bird-safe buildings.
icon 2015-04-30 C100 Comments On Re-proposed Regulations On Private Improvements To DDOT-Controlled Pocket Parks, 24 DCMR 3314
April 30, 2015 , Nancy MacWood
The Committee of 100 on the Federal City (C 100) greatly appreciates the efforts of the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) to protect public triangle parks for public use, a vital benefit to District of Columbia residents. Our comments, filed before the deadline of May 3, 2015, follow.

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